Laxmi Lower G.I. Value Rice For People With Diabetes – 4lb

Laxmi Diabetic Basmati Rice is specially cultivated and processed to create a low G.I. level rice. This makes the rice suitable for health conscious diabetic patients, when used in moderate quantities. This basmati rice has a lower glycemic Index than traditional basmati rice and great source of fiber. Available in 4lb packages. Use in traditional Indian dishes or substitute for any rice dish.

Product Features

  • Laxmi Lower G.I. Index Value Basmati Rice
  • 4lb
  • Lower G.I value
  • Good source of fiber

Peanut Butter and Diabetes?

 

Hello, I’m Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I’m going to answer the question, is peanut butter good for diabetes. So who invented peanut butter? I bet you were going to say George Washington Carver right? Well, he did “invent” something similar to what we call peanut butter today. Marcellus Gilmore Edson was awarded U.S. Patent 306,727( for the production of peanut butter) in 1804.   Carver was merely 20 at the time. But possibly a little bit closer to which is something we use today was developed by Dr John Harvey Kellogg( yes, the cereal person) in 1895,  Then a St. Louis Doctor made a spread for this patients who needed protein but had difficulty chewing. This spread was first introduced at the St Louis World’s Fair in 1904. Regardless of who invented it, I really like peanut butter.

I personally am a Jif guy with all respect to the Skippy and other label devotees. Nutritionally peanut butter is a powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fattens, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Peanut butter also contains no cholesterol. The carbohydrate contents of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving.

The glycemic index of peanut butter is a extremely low-grade 14 which delivers the glycemic load to perfectly ZERO. Peanut butter will not elevate your blood sugar and it also helps regulate your blood sugar with all the amino battery-acids and proteins. When eaten with high-GI meat, peanut butter also helps lowering the spike of blood sugar after snacking. Carol S. Johnson, Ph.D ., guided a study at Arizona State University where researchers likened the blood-sugar levels of two snacks. One snack consisted of a buttered bagel and juice. The second snack substituted the butter with peanut butter which resulted in a minimal rise and fall of blood sugar, while the buttered bagel caused the level considerably more. So YES, peanut butter is very good for diabetes. Feed up! Merely be careful with the jelly!

As found on Youtube

OWell Diabetes Sterile Lancets 30 Gauge for Blood Glucose Testing Single Use (200)

A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. Owell™ Lancets are assembled and used to make punctures clean and easy, such as a finger stick, to obtain small sterile blood specimens. These Blood lancets are for single use, and can be best disposed of in a sharps container. Each OWell lancet is surgical steel grade and silicon coated with its twist off cover to insure and provide a sterile needle for each diabetes test. OWell™ carefully manufactured and perfected each lancet to provide a reduced pain, during each lancet prick. The lancet twist off cover can be used to carefully cover each lance needle to insure a secure and safe deposition. The 30 gauge needle are most common upon diabetic patients. Its proper gauge size is dependent upon the thickness of the patient’s skin which can help reduce pain. Owell constructed each lancet to be compatible to most lancing devices on the market. (Not compatible with accu-check lancing device). We provide 100% customer satisfaction to each and every Owell™ product.

How to use an OWell™ Blood Glucose Lancets to receive best results?

1. Wash your hands, finger or other site with soap and water dry thoroughly and let your hand air dry, or use an alcohol pad to clean the area thoroughly and wait until the alcohol evaporates.
2. Twist off protective lancet cover. Be careful not to pull off the cover!
3. Prick the site with the lancet opening firmly against chosen area.
4. Follow the instructions for inserting the test strip and using the blood glucose meter.
5. Insert the test strip into the blood glucose meter according to manufacturer instructions.
6. Put a required drop of blood on a test strip.
7. Discard used lancet in appropriate container.

Warning: Contains small and sharp parts. Keep out of reach of small children and pets.

Product Features

  • LESS PAIN: OWell TM painless design silicon coated sterile lancets helps reduce pain of its prick.
  • UNIVERSAL: Compatible with most lancet devices on the market. (Not compatible with accu-check lancing device).
  • RELIABLE: 30 gauge needle is the perfect size for the average diabetic patient.
  • CONVENIENT: Easy twist off lancet caps makes it easy and a secure way to dispose after use.
  • SATISFACTION GUARANTEE: We provide 100% customer satisfaction to each and every Owell TM product.

The Perfect Treatment for Diabetes and Weight Loss

 

 

Is type 2 diabetes incurable? Must it get worse with age? Or as a society are We treating it wrong? Or do we treat it at all?  My name is Andreas Eenfeldt from Diet Doc. Welcome Dr. Jason Fung. I have just listened to your lecture. It was fantastic. It was about how we treat diabetics in health care today. It is not a disease that must necessarily  get worse with age. We have always said that it is a chronic condition that worsens with age.This is the view of the diabetes associations, both in the US and in Australia. Everyone says it is a chronic disease.

But it is not true. It is indeed easy to see. If someone said, “I was told I had diabetes,” – – “but I lost weight and lowered my carbs.” “Now I take no medication and am doing well.” It is true after all! No one believes that they are lying. A patient who loses weight, put on a diet  -is of course healthier. How can they be healthier if the disease is chronic and only going to get worse? Everyone knows that the drugs do not help against the disease itself. Type 2 diabetes depends on too high insulin resistance.

It is all agreed. High resistance to insulin makes blood sugar levels rise. But the disease is the high insulin resistance. But all treatment focuses still on blood sugar. It is not logical.   Treatment of symptoms does not help against the disease,as we have done with diabetes. We treat blood sugar. But the disease depends on insulin resistance. Since we do not treat the disease  only the symptoms nothing improves. It takes more and more medication to keep blood sugar at the same level. The diabetes is worse even if blood sugar is better. The diabetes is worse than ever.

Insulin Resistance’s not treated. Those who lose weight, exercise  have affected insulin resistance, and therefore a lower blood sugar.

We have dealt with in the short term and reduced sugar. What happens then with the disease?

The funny thing is that patients know this. I talk with many patients. They tell me that when they got insulin they immediately gained weight. It’s no secret. You gain weight taking insulin. They take insulin and gain weight. Then they come back to the doctor. “I needed to lose weight, but get medicine that cause weight gain!?” And the doctor responds: “You need insulin

– Therefore, you must treat it. – What do you do if you have type 2 diabetes? It is a diet-related disease. Type 2 diabetes involves too much sugar. Once you have realized it, the solution is to do away with the sugar. Then remove all sugar and simple carbs, which also is the sugar -As bread and pasta. Carbohydrates are the only chains of sugar. When we eat, it breaks down into sugar. You have to stop eating sugar.

Formula 2 Skin Care Cream (4 & 8 oz.) For Dry, Cracked, Irritated, or Itchy Skin Resulting From Diabetes, Wounds, Diaper Rash, Eczema, Psoriasis, Radiation Therapy, Incontinence, Bed Sores, Sunburn

Formula II is a “Multi-Purpose Skin Care Cream”TM developed by a father and son pharmacist team. It is packaged in three sizes: 2 oz. jar, 4 oz. tube, and 8 oz. jar. Formula II can be used to moisturize and protect any type of dry, cracked, irritated or itchy skin on your hands, feet, or anywhere on the body resulting from: diabetic dry skin, eczema, psoriasis, diaper rash, incontinence care, wound care, radiation therapy burns, sunburn, tattoo maintenance, bed sores/pressure ulcers, and hailey-hailey disease to name a few. If you have dry cracked hands, dry cracked feet, ashy knees, ashy elbows, dry chapped lips, or chafing in private areas from physical activities then this product is for you!

Product Features

  • SAY GOODBYE TO DRY, CRACKED, IRRITATED, OR ITCHY SKIN. Our formula is a highly concentrated moisturizer and barrier cream in one that provides deep hydration and protection for your skin.
  • FORMULATED BY A PHARMACIST. Our product was created by a father and son pharmacist team with over 80 years combined experience in chemistry and skin care. It also contains ingredients to help prevent yeast build up from moisture and an agent to balance the pH levels of your skin.
  • APPLY IT ANYWHERE FROM HEAD TO TOES. Excellent for the skin on your hands, feet, or anywhere on the body. By simply applying it at least twice per day, you will see significant results and improvements in your skin. If used on face, apply lightly to avoid excessive moisture.
  • SAFE FOR ALL AGES. An excellent product for everyone from infants to the elderly and all in between.
  • NO HARSH CHEMICALS. No Alcohol – No Fragrance – No Lanolin – No Zinc Oxide – No Parabens. MADE IN THE USA. We proudly manufacture our product in Florida.

Insulin Resistance Diet: The Essential Insulin Diet Guide – Lose Weight, Prevent Diabetes and Optimize Your Body With Over 100 Amazing Recipes

Discover How To Take Control Of Your Health And Defeat Insulin Resistance With This Essential Guide!
Are you struggling with weight loss? Do you spend hours exercising and counting calories to no avail? Do you often find yourself feeling tired, groggy, and hungry? If you answered yes to any or all of these questions, you could be suffering from Insulin Resistance.

Insulin Resistance Diet: The Essential Insulin Diet Guide – Lose Weight, Prevent Diabetes and Optimize Your Body With Over 100 Amazing Recipes
Insulin Resistance can be a frustrating condition to manage, and with good reason. Turn on the TV, you’ll soon be bombarded with advertisements that promote a range of products from unhealthy food choices to weight management programs. With so many options available, regaining a healthy lifestyle can become daunting.
Best-selling author Craig Miller knows this struggle all too well and has done the research for you so you can slim down, feel great, and live a healthy life. Through Insulin Resistance, Miller gives you the tools to not only beat the condition, but potentially save your life or the life of someone you love.
With The Essential Insulin Resistance Diet Guide You’ll Learn …

  • The little-known FACTS on Insulin Resistance and why it might be keeping you FAT
  • How ANYONE could be at risk and how to IDENTIFY it in your body
  • Strategies to CONQUER Insulin Resistance
  • Over 100 DELICIOUS recipes to optimize your health
  • Diet and exercise plans to SHED that extra weight
  • Advice to OPTIMIZE your body’s potential
  • Tips and tricks to live a HEALTHIER life

Here Are Just A Few Delicious Recipes You’ll Find:

  • Ham, Soft Poached Egg, and Asparagus
  • Blueberry Popovers with Berry Salad
  • Prawn-Quinoa Salad
  • Tarragon Chicken with Baby Spinach
  • Chicken Tacos with Mango-Bean Salsa
  • Mushroom Risotto
  • Strawberry Coconut Popsicles
  • And Much, Much More!

You don’t have to fight Insulin Resistance alone. Get healthy, burn fat and grab your copy today!

Diabetes Patients Fed up with Insulin Prices

Diabetes Patients File Lawsuit

A group of diabetes patients filed a lawsuit Monday against three drug companies for systematically increasing the list prices of insulin for years in an alleged fraudulent-pricing scheme

The insulin market is dominated by a small number of companies that sell many billions of dollars worth of insulin each year — and have steadily raised the list prices of their drugs. A version of insulin called Humalog launched two decades ago with a sticker price of $21 a vial and has increased to $255 a vial.

Meanwhile, competition has appeared to work in a perverse way, with list prices of competing insulins often rising in concert. Last year, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md.) asked for a federal investigation into “possible collusion” on insulin prices.

The lawsuit, filed by 11 patients in U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, focuses on a common practice in the pharmaceutical industry: Drug companies compete for insurers’ business by offering secret rebates on their drugs. Companies that negotiate drug prices for insurers, called pharmacy benefit managers, can place drugs on tiers that determine how much consumers pay for them — decisions that may be influenced by the size of the discount granted by the drug companies.

The lawsuit claims that drug companies have been increasing the list price of insulin in order to expand their discounts without lowering the overall price tag. The people stuck paying the balance: patients, particularly those without insurance or with high-deductible plans.  The lawsuit alleges those actions violate the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and state consumer protection laws.

“I think that publishing a price that you know is artificially inflated and is not a real price — other than to one group of people — is a fraud,” said Steve Berman, a partner in the with Hagens Berman law firm who represents the plaintiffs.

The lawsuit describes a patient who may need to have her foot amputated because she cannot afford her insulin. Others, it says, have intentionally allowed themselves to develop a potentially life-threatening syndrome so that they can be admitted to a hospital and obtain free insulin samples.

“This scheme directly and foreseeably causes consumers to overpay for these life-saving medications,” the lawsuit states.

Insulin companies acknowledge that list prices have risen but argue that net prices — the amount drug companies are paid after rebates — haven’t budged.

Eli Lilly “conducts business in a manner that ensures compliance with all applicable laws, and we adhere to the highest ethical standards,” spokesman Greg Kueterman said in an email, declining to comment further.

A spokeswoman for Sanofi said that the company believes the allegations have no merit and will defend against them.

Novo Nordisk spokesman Ken Inchausti said in an email: “We are aware of the complaint and its characterization of the pharmaceutical supply chain. We disagree with the allegations made against the company and are prepared to vigorously defend the company in this matter.”

The Pharmaceutical Care Management Association, a trade group that represents pharmacy benefit managers, said it is reviewing the lawsuit and pointed out that its companies are not defendants. But in a statement, the association said the lawsuit “inexplicably attacks prescription drug rebates, long used to reduce costs in public programs like Medicaid and in the commercial market.”

Rising drug list prices have become a major issue for the biopharmaceutical industry as various pricing controversies triggered by list-price hikes have flared into congressional hearings and prompted other scrutiny over the past year and a half. Although drugmakers grant discounts off the list prices to pharmacy benefit companies, those may not always be passed through directly to consumers.

For example, people with high-deductible plans or co-insurance requiring them to pay a percentage of the drug cost can be directly affected by rising list prices. As more consumers are using health insurance that includes high deductibles, more patients are being exposed to the list price of a drug. In addition, insulin is a drug people take for a lifetime, so any gaps in health insurance or issues such as losing or breaking a vial of insulin could expose them to the list price of their medicine.

The lawsuit says pharmacy benefit managers that negotiate on drug prices for insurers play a role in the alleged scheme by telling the public the rebates were saving patients and insurers money, even when they know rebates aren’t lowering the real price of the insulin.

Brian Henry, a spokesman for Express Scripts, one of the largest pharmacy benefit managers, declined to comment on the lawsuit, but he said in an email, “Rebates don’t raise drug prices. Drugmakers raise drug prices.”

Erin Britt, a spokeswoman for CVS Health said that the company passes more than 90 percent of its rebates back to customers.