Pistachio Power

Pistachio Power!

A new study highlighted in the Tufts University Health and Nutrition Letter suggests that eating tree nuts such as Pistachios may help fight Type II  Diabetes.  Tree nuts include walnuts, hazelnuts,almonds,brazil nuts,cashews, pecans, pine nuts,macadamia nuts  and of course pistachios.

How Tree Nuts Help?

Tree nuts according to the report help the body better control blood sugar and help to reduce inflammation  Prediabetic patients in a study done in Spain ate two ounces or 57 grams of Pistachios daily.  After 4 months this group had significant reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels and showed a reduction of inflammation in their bodies.   It was pointed out that Pistachios are a concentrated energy source so you would need to eat them instead of something else you might eat to keep your calorie consumption under control.

A Powerful Pistachio Punch!

Two Ounces of Pistachios contain:

  • 321 Calories
  • 11.9 grams of protein
  • 5.6 grams of fiber
  • 16.7 grams of carbohydrates
  • 571 milligrams of potassium
  • 21 grams of unsaturated fat
  • 3 grams of saturated fat
  • no cholesterol

In conclusion studies showed adding more tree nuts into your diet may help to lower your levels of fasting glucose and your HbAic over time. A possible explanation offered is that tree nuts are high in healthy fats and fiber are low in carbohydrates and by substituting this for foods you should not be consuming you lower the glycemic load on your body.

Invokana Has Reported Serious Side Effects

Invokana linked to serious side effects - Legal Examiner

 

 

 

Invokana is linked to serious side effects. Medical experts state Invokana medication is linked to severe and life-threatening side effects including kidney failure, leg amputations, heart attacks and diabetic ketoacidosis., a build up of acid in the body known as diabetic ketoacidosis

Invokana  was the first member of a new generation diabetes drug to hit the market, known as sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors.  Others in this class of drugs include Farxiga, Jardiance, and Invokamet

Increased Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

SGLT-2 inhibitors alter normal kidney functions to increase the amount of sugar excreted in the urine.

As a result of this, the body loses the carbohydrates that it needs to function, and the kidneys become stressed and damaged by sugar molecules.

Because of a reduced amount of circulating sugar, the body goes into “starvation” mode where it begins to break down muscle tissue and stored fat to generate ketones as fuel. This condition is called “diabetic ketoacidosis” and can be deadly if left untreated.

In June 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required the drug makers to add a new Invokana safety warning, highlighting that the diabetic medication may increase the risk of acute kidney injury and kidney failure.

The FDA has also required new Invokana warnings about a risk of diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious medical condition associated with elevated levels of acid in the blood.

Increased Risk of Amputations

Based on new data from two large clinical trials, the FDA in May 2017 concluded that the type 2 diabetes medicine canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) causes an increased risk of leg and foot amputations.

Final results from two clinical trials – the CANVAS (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) and CANVAS-R (A Study of the Effects of Canagliflozin on Renal Endpoints in Adult Participants With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) – showed that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients treated with canagliflozin compared to patients treated with placebo, which is an inactive treatment.

As a result one has to question the use of these type of drugs and maybe consider the difficult choice for some to control their diabetes by diet and exercise if it is an option.  At minimum one should question their doctor about diabetes medications prescribed and do your own research,  Your Dr. should closely monitor your health when taking this or other similar medications.  If your Doctor knows less than you do about Diabetes you might want to find another who at minmum is willing to let you take an active role in your own care.

My opinion is that the American Diabetes Association is too chummy with the diabetes drug industry and their  guidelines are not stringent enough to protect your health and your doctor may lack the necessaary education or is just overwhelmed with patients.

 Sitting in a Dr’s Office where my Dad goes you are exposed to one long diabetes commercial interspersed with drug ads .  It tells me that the diabetes epidemic is real and YOU have to be responsible for your own health!  A recent article I posted pointed out the huge number of drugmakers at the ADA conference and the huge money being made by drug companies selling diabetic drugs. Read this post also on this blog, http://suddenlydiabetic.com/diabetes-drugs-cost-soar/

You can bet that your Dr is getting hit up by attractive drug representatives pushing these various companies drugs with incentives to prescribe them.

Knowledge is Power so visit here often for the latest news!

 

George Bush hated this but your A1C won’t!

George H.W. Bush famously noted his dislike for Broccoli in 1990.

 

 

Broccoli contains an ingredient that can help those with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar level, according to a new study – potentially providing a much-needed treatment option for millions.

A chemical in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and brussel sprouts called sulforaphane is thought to be responsible, having been shown to lower glucose levels in earlier lab experiments on diabetic rats.

To identify suitable compounds to examine, researchers used computer models to identify gene expression changes linked with type 2 diabetes, and then sifted through thousands of chemicals that might reverse these changes.

“We’re very excited about the effects we’ve seen and are eager to bring the extract to patients,” one of the researchers, Anders Rosengren of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, told Andy Coghlan at New Scientist.

“We saw a reduction of glucose of about 10 per cent, which is sufficient to reduce complications in the eyes, kidneys and blood.”

That 10 percent average reduction was across a sample of 97 human volunteers taking part in a 12-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial. The participants who were obese and who had higher baseline glucose levels to begin with benefitted the most.

The dose was the equivalent of around 5 kilograms (11 pounds) of broccoli daily – a fair few platefuls – but the researchers say it could be adapted into a powder to add to food or drinks.

It’s important to note that all but three of those taking part in the trial continued to take metformin, a drug already used to improve blood sugar regulation in people with diabetes.

However, the researchers think sulforaphane could eventually replace metformin for some patients – up to 15 percent of those with diabetes can’t take metformin because of the associated risks of kidney damage.

With more than 29 million people having type 2 diabetes in the US alone, and that number on the rise, any kind of help is going to be very welcome.

Before the human trial, the researchers also found sulforaphane was able to reduce glucose production in liver cells grown in a lab, and shift liver gene expression away from an abnormal, diseased state in diabetic rats.

Larger and more detailed studies are required before the drug can get approved for regular treatments though, and until then it’s probably wise to keep your vegetable intake to a normal, healthy level.

“More research is needed to see if this repurposed drug can be used to treat Type 2 diabetes, as it was only tested in a small number of people and only helped a subset of those who are taking it,” Elizabeth Robertson from Diabetes UK, who wasn’t involved in the research, told New Scientist.

“For now, we recommend that people continue with the treatment prescribed by their healthcare team.”

Reduce your weight, Change your fate!

Prediabetes can progress to Type II Diabetes but it is not a given particularly if you can lose a small amount of weight. A Harvard Medical Assistant Professor, Rhonda Bentley-Lewis recently said, “. “I stress to my patients that we’re not talking about a huge amount of weight,” she said, “just 5 to 7 percent of one’s body weight” — or 10 to 14 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds.

Doctors often treat prediabetes with medication. Many patients choose to try weight loss and exercise first. Among thousands of people with prediabetes who participated in a national study called the Diabetes Prevention Program, those who received counseling about lifestyle changes, like losing a modest amount of weight, stepping up physical activity and reducing the amount of fat and calories in their diets, were able to reduce their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent.

woman exercising photo
Photo by kennethkonica

My advice:
1) Eliminate sugar. If you must use something use Stevia.
2) Increase water intake.
3) Increase your physical activity
4) Reduce your portion sizes or limit yourself to one bowl, plate, No refills.
5) Reduce the size of your plate.
6) Monitor your blood sugar levels, 2 hours after each meal. Make adjustments to keep your blood sugar at 100 or below.

Are Diabetes Drugs The Answer?

If you are diabetic and fail to control your blood glucose levels, you will most likely end up with several debilitating health problems such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, diabetic neuropathy, digestive problems, blindness, or a variety of infections.

 

Many of these conditions could kill you.

So taking diabetic drugs to manage your  Type II diabetes might seem like the right thing to do.

Well maybe not… for several good reasons.

Survival rates using diabetes medications are not so promising.

According to a research paper Benefits of Diabetes Drugs Dubious, published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in December 2014, no doctor-prescribed diabetes drug has been shown to save the life of a diabetic. They didn’t prevent heart attacks, strokes, kidney disease, nerve damage, blindness or other diabetes complications such as the need for amputations.

High blood sugar levels are not the same as diabetes. They are only signs or symptoms of diabetes but they are not the disease itself. The problem is: diabetes drugs target blood sugar levels only… they do not treat diabetes. But very few people die of high blood sugar in their blood.

However they do die of the damage caused by diabetes: heart disease, strokes, kidney disease and raging infections… and diabetes drugs do nothing for them.

A peer-reviewed meta-study; Comparison of Clinical Outcomes and Adverse Events Associated with Glucose-lowering Drugs in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2016, showed that there was no increase in survival rates among type 2 diabetics who took diabetes medications.

The study examined nine classes of diabetes drugs, including insulin, comparing the drugs to a placebo. The researchers reviewed more than 300 randomized clinical trials covering nearly 120,000 patients before reaching their conclusions.

Dangers of Diabetes Drugs

Drugs for diabetes are have serious side effects.

These include cardiovascular reactions, flu-like symptoms and dizziness. They have been linked to muscle and stomach pain, diarrhea and anemia. In addition, if diabetics are not careful, these drugs can cause dangerously low blood glucose levels.

The bad thing is that many patients take two or even three of these drugs at the same time, all prescribed by their doctor .

But, instead of reducing deaths, this multi-drug regime increases your chances of dying.

A research paper Effects of Intensive Glucose Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2008, concluded that intense efforts to lower blood glucose with drugs resulted in a 22% higher rate of death from all causes. The same study showed that deaths from heart disease increased by a whopping 35%.

So what should you do?

Can you Reverse Your Diabetes Without Diabetic Drugs?

The fact is that some  people believe there is no need, unless your diabetes is far advanced, to use these drugs at all. They believe can reverse your diabetes using diet alone, perhaps with a little extra exercise thrown in.

There is no cure for diabetes, IE once you have it well you have it. But when I say you can reverse your diabetes, What I mean is you can beat the awful consequences the disease brings such as the cardiovascular problems, strokes, kidney disease and so on.

The beating-diabetes diet is simple. It requires a small amount of discipline.

You can reverse type 2 diabetes by eating foods that are :

(1) low in sugar
(2) low in fat
(3) low in salt,
(4) high in fiber and that
(5) are digested slowly.

The easiest way to do this is by concentrating on natural, unprocessed foods that are mostly plants. You also need to avoid all dairy products and eggs, and to drink plenty of water.

The fundamental cause of type 2 diabetes is fat blocking the receptors in your muscle cells, leaving glucose (produced by the digestive process) and insulin (produced by the pancreas) swirling around in your bloodstream. This condition is called insulin resistance.

The diet works because it minimizes your intake of fat so that, after a month or so, the fat blocking the receptors in your muscle cells will have disappeared.  This fat is normally in your midsection.

Unblocking the receptors ensures that the insulin can do its job of opening those receptors to get the glucose out of your bloodstream and into cells, thus ‘reversing’ your diabetes.

As well you should also take up some mild exercise, such as walking, gardening, swimming, dancing , etc. This will help stimulate your muscle cells to use the energy (glucose) floating around in your blood stream.

Also, you can give the reversing-diabetes diet a boost in several ways using various supplements:

Vitamin D

Low levels of vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 Supplement by Just Potent :: 500 Softgels :: 5000 IU :: Strong Bones & Immune Health :: Full Benefits of the Sun in a Tiny Softgel :: 500 Days of Uninterrupted Supply :: Gluten Free New Price: $19.99 Old Price: $19.99 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) have been linked to both pre-diabetes and full-blown diabetes. A lot of people have a vitamin D deficiency.

A research paper entitled Lipoprotein lipase links vitamin D, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional epidemiological study, undertaken by Chinese researchers and published in January 2013 in Cardiovascular Diabetology, showed that even a minor defecit in vitamin D3 can increase the risk of diabetes by more than 90%.

So how do you increase your intake of vitamin D3?

You can get sufficient vitamin D3 by getting outside for just 10 minutes or so a day in the midday sun… with a lot of skin showing which might be a little rough in the winter but thank god there are supplements

You could also get plenty of vitamin D by eating oily fish (tuna, sardines, mackerel and salmon), free-range eggs, grass-fed beef, liver and dairy products. But these foods contain copious amounts of fats which you need to minimize if you are to reverse your diabetes.

For diabetics, therefore, the best way to get sufficient vitamin D3 Vitamin D3 Supplement by Just Potent :: 500 Softgels :: 5000 IU :: Strong Bones & Immune Health :: Full Benefits of the Sun in a Tiny Softgel :: 500 Days of Uninterrupted Supply :: Gluten Free New Price: $19.99 Old Price: $19.99 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) is to take a supplement. The recommended dosage is 8,000 IU’s (international units) a day.

Guava

The leaves, stems and flesh (but not the skins) of the tropical guava fruit block the digestion of carbohydrates which reduces spikes in blood glucose. Consuming pealed guava also makes the development of insulin resistance less likely and helps improve the blood sugar levels of diabetics.

If fresh guava is available in your locality you should eat it daily. If not, you can get guava tea Guava Leaf Tea 120 Individually Wrapped Teabags New Price: $59.99 Old Price: $59.99You Save: $40.78 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) made from dried leaves at your local health food store or online. A cup a day (or more) is highly recommended.

Vanadium

Vanadium Source Naturals Vanadium with Chromium, 180 Tablets New Price: $13.43 Old Price: $11.43 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) is a trace mineral that acts like insulin.

Vanadium reduces spikes in blood glucose and insulin levels by helping to move blood glucose into muscle cells and by inhibiting the absorption of glucose from the gut.

In a study described in Rare Earths: Forbidden Cures, Rare Earths: Forbidden Cures New Price: $18.10 Old Price: $21.95You Save: $3.85 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) a book published in 1994, diabetics took daily supplements of vanadium… their average blood glucose levels dropped by 10% in only three weeks.

You can use vanadium by taking it as a supplement… 500 mcg three times a day… but:

Caution:Do not exceed 10 mg a day.

Berberine

Berberine Amazing Formulas Berberine 500mg 120 capsules - Supports Immune Function, Glucose Metabolism and Cardiovascular & Gastrointestinal Function New Price: $19.99 Old Price: $19.99 (as of 10/19/2017 14:14 America/New_York) is a plant nutrient found in the roots, rhizomes, stems and bark of medicinal herbs such as barberry, tree turmeric, Oregon grape, goldenseal, yellowroot, Chinese goldthread, prickly poppy, and Californian poppy.

In the 1980s, Chinese doctors discovered that berberine can normalize blood glucose levels. It does this by decreasing insulin resistance, by decreasing the production of sugar in the liver, and by increasing the ability to breakdown glucose inside cells.

To lower the levels of sugar in your blood, you should take a supplement… one 500 mg capsule with meals two or three times a day.

Caution: I am not a medical doctor and my strong advice is that you consult your doctor before you stop taking your prescribed diabetes medications.

I do believe though that you are your best advocate and doing your own research and trying to stay off diabetes medications by improving your diet and by exercise is worth a shot. In my case my doctor agreed with this approach and I have thus far avoided taking diabetic medications to control my insulin levels

This article is based on an article by Paul D Kennedy

Paul D Kennedy is a type 2 diabetic. He used his skills as an international consultant and researcher to find a way to control his diabetes using diet alone and, about seven years ago, he stopped taking medications to control his blood glucose levels.   His book, Beating Diabetes, How to Defeat type II Diabetes is available  from Amazon.

 

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes effects many parts of the body. One part of the body that often is affected are the feet. Losing feeling and experiencing numbness in the feet can occur over time. This is sometimes the result of  diabetic neuropathy which can occur because of high blood sugar injuring nerve fibers in the feet.

One  type of diabetic neuropathy is called peripheral neuropathy. This is the most common type and most often affects the feet and legs. Some of the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy are often experienced and are worse in the evenings. According to information from the Mayo Clinic, symptoms include:

• Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes.

“The CDC says the occurrence of diabetes related foot and lower-leg amputation has decreased by 65 percent since 1996.”Dr. Frank Spinosa, President, American Podiatric Medical Association

• Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing.

• Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain.

Pro-actively taking steps to monitor key health indicators, experts agree that it’s possible to prevent some of the most severe risks of diabetes, including lower limb amputation.

People ages 20 and older who are living with diabetes account for about 60 percent of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

A foot mirror canbe very helpful.  See this related post.

http://suddenlydiabetic.com/vas-34-telescoping-foot-inspection-mirror-illuminated-aids-diabetics-in-inspection-for-foot-sores/

People with diabetes may be less aware of cuts or wounds on their feet due to the nerve damage related to their disease, Spinosa points out. “Regular and vigilant foot care can help catch problems before they develop into a health crisis.”

Inspect your feet daily, checking the entire foot and all 10 toes for cuts, bruises, sores or changes to the toenails, such as thickening or discoloration.  Treat wounds immediately and see your podiatrist if a problem persists or infection is apparent.

 

Exercise by walking, which can help you maintain a healthy weight and improve circulation. Be sure to wear appropriate athletic shoes appropriate for the type of exercise you’re doing.

When you buy new shoes, have them properly measured and fitted. Foot size and shape can change throughout time, and ill-fitting shoes are a leading cause of foot pain and lesions. Certain types of shoes, socks and custom orthotics are available for people with diabetes, and they may be covered under Medicare. You can find a list of podiatrist-approved footwear and products for people with diabetes on the APMA website.

Keep your feet covered and never go barefoot even at home. The risk of cuts and infection is too great.

See a podiatrist to remove calluses, corns or warts – don’t tackle them yourself and don’t ask a unlicensed nonprofessional to do it. Over-the-counter products can burn your skin and injure your foot. Podiatrists are specially trained to address all aspects of foot health for people with diabetes.

Get checkups twice a year. An exam by your podiatrist is the best way to ensure your feet stay healthy.

“For people with diabetes, taking charge of your own foot health can help you avoid foot-related complications like amputation,” Spinosa said. “Work with today’s podiatrist to help you safeguard your foot health.”

To learn more about foot care for people with diabetes or to find a podiatrist, visit http://www.apma.org.

8- Week Blood Sugar Diet Review

This is a review of the popular book by Dr. Michael Mosley. New York Times Bestselling Author, Author of The Fast Diet

This is Dr. Mosely’s diet plan he used to go from being a raging type II diabetic to now having normal blood sugar numbers. He became curious upon observing an observation by Dr. Roy Taylor of individuals who had bariatric surgery and the huge drop in their bad blood sugar numbers. This worked because of the surgery creates a much smaller stomach which reduces the amount of food one can consume which resulted in weight loss. Dr. Taylor believes that insulin resistance is the result of fat surrounding and overwhelming the pancreas and liver and losing this fat allows the pancreas and liver to recover.

Prediabetes rates in the UK have went from 10% to 35% of the population in the past 10 years.
86 Million Americans are Prediabetic. Losing that excess fat particuarly in your midsection quickly can often return your blood sugar numbers back to normal. In my opinion and Dr. Mosely’s that much better than taking diabetes medication.

In the book, Dr. Mosely accomplishes this by an 800 calorie daily diet. Cutting sugar and low quality carbs with over 50 recipes included and the science behind the diet is thoroughly explained.

One thing I liked is Dr. Mosely explains who this plan is not for for instance pregnant women or woman breatfeeding, anyone with a history of eating disorders, on blood pressure medication or taking diabetes medication without close supervision by your doctor, moderate or severe retinopathy, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, taking warfarin, a BMI below 21, under 18 years old or in generally poor health.

Another thing I like our the quizes included about your level of risk for becoming a type II diabetic and Are you addicted to carbs?

From my own personal experience rapidly losing my excess weight by watching my sugar and carb intake reduced my blood sugar numbers back down to a normal level and I have managed to keep the weight off.

Dr. Mosley’s book appears to be well researched and gives you the information you need.

You can pick up the book here

66% of folks ordering on Amazon gave it a 5 star rating.

Here is one reader’s experience after 8-weeks on the diet.

 

How To Read A Food Label– for people with diabetes

Wondering how to read a food label. Once you get the hang of it, labels are easy to read because you don’t actually have to read the whole thing. There are just a few key pieces of information you need to find to help you understand how what’s inside  will affect your blood glucose. So, let’s  take alook at a typical label… The first thing you want to consider is the serving size. All the information  is based on this particular serving size. Servings per container is also listed at the top and that shows how many servings are in the whole bag, can or bottle. This is important, because the container is probably more than one serving. For example you’d probably eat this bag of chips in a single sitting but according to the label, the bag has three servings in it.

So if you’re going to eat the whole bag of chips and you want to know how many calories or carbs you are eating, you’ll have to multiply the number on the label by three. The calories are listed here and they’re important to keep an eye on as you’re planning meals and snacks.

Here are some general calorie guidelines for people with diabetes. The most common mistake people with diabetes make when reading labels is to focus on the line labeled sugar, but that only tells part of the story. If you want to know how a food will actually affect your blood glucose, you need to look at the Total Carbohydrate count, right here.

That number includes the grams of sugar, and the higher the Total Carb count is, the more that food or drink will raise your blood glucose. In general, a woman shouldn’t have more than 45 grams of carbs in an entire meal and a man shouldn’t have more than 60 grams of carbs in a meal. Ask your doctor or diabetes educator what is right for you. Think of that number as your “carb budget” for the meal. In a lot of ways, it’s like a household budget—you only have so much money and you have to pay your rent, the light bill, the gas bill and so on. To budget your carbs, you need to look at each part of your meal.

Does your drink have carbs? Your main dish? Your dessert? Add them up. If you are over budget, reduce the serving size of some of your items, or substitute a lower carb item for one of the higher carb items. And that’s how to read a label. To wrap up, what you need to check on a label are the serving size, the calories and the carb count. The higher the Total Carbohydrate number, the more the food will raise your blood glucose. You can use your recommended carb budget to budget your carbs and lower the blood glucose impact of your meals. Thanks for watching—see you next time..

As found on Youtube

Sugar Free, Gluten Free, And Vegan Are NOT Carb Free !

Diabetes can pose a number of challenges to those with the diagnosis.

With a heavy emphasis on foods, content and the impacts of those choices, understanding nutrition labels can be a daunting task.

“There’s a lot of label confusion, so we’re here to help,” said Patricia Zimmerman, a registered dietitian and a certified diabetes educator with the Diabetes Support Group through Monongahela Valley Hospital.

“A lot of people have questions about better choices,” said Zimmerman. “We also have questions from people about whether they need supplements.”

Zimmerman said a common misconception is associated with sugar-free items.

“Sugar-free doesn’t mean lower carbs. They forget there’s other forms of carbs,” she said. “We want to steer them in the right direction.”

McClain said one of the keys to success is going with, and sticking to, a shopping list.

“Don’t shop when you’re hungry,” McClain said. “And stick to the perimeter of the store. There’s where the dairy, meats, fruits and veggies are located.”

“If you have to go into the inner aisles, get what you need and get out,” she added with a laugh. “It’ll also cut back on impulse buying.”

McClain also stressed the importance of understanding labels, noting that basic label reading can help people eat less, lose weight and focus on the food’s contents to help blood sugar controls.

“Most of us eat on autopilot. We eat because it’s there in front of us, whether we need it or not,” she said. “Label reading will make you more aware. It’s the first step.”

Pantry items include canned vegetables, rice, tuna, pasta and nuts.

Remember Gluten Free or Vegan does not mean carbohydrate free .  It is important to look at the number of carbs, grams of sugar, grams of fiber per serving and the number of servings in the container. If the food is in a package get in the habit of looking at these numbers and evn when your tempted to eat those peasnut butter cups or cookies one look at the label should shock you back into reality.  

Educate the public about diabetes | Letters To The Editor … – LancasterOnline

Mar 2017 04:33:29 GMT

 

Educate the public about diabetes | Letters To The Editor ... - LancasterOnline Educate the public about diabetes | Letters To The Editor … – LancasterOnline

 

 

Mark’s Note: This nurse’s comments in a local paper ring true.  One of the drivers of our sky high medical costs is the Diabetes epidemic in our country.  She is correct also that the newsmedia needs to pay more attention and help educate the public. Use caution when purchasing used test strips.

I am writing in regard to the Feb. 24 online article “Diabetic test strip prices spur shady secondhand market.” As a registered nurse, I wish to commend you on  on your diligence to shed light on a public health issue. 

Diabetes mellitus is a huge concern in Lancaster County and the surrounding areas; roughly 15 percent of people in Lancaster have diabetes. Diabetes is a multifocal problem. Patients are more likely to have high blood pressure, a stroke, heart disease, blindness, poor circulation to the lower extremities, and even mortality.

Per 100,000 people in Lancaster, 362 will die as a result of diabetes. When diabetes is poorly managed, the risks for complications greatly increase. It is extremely important for diabetics to always have the supplies they need to control their blood sugars.

As your article mentioned, supplies are often too costly to buy. This leaves patients buying cheaper, expired supplies that may be faulty.

Nationally, we spend $174 billion annually on diabetic care. This number will continue to rise as more people are diagnosed with diabetes. I urge you to continue to write well-informed articles on diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. We can bring more awareness to the disease by sharing these alarming statistics.

Rather then just writing on the cost of the disease, I encourage you to increase the knowledge of Lancaster residents. The newspaper is a prime opportunity to educate people who are at high risk for diabetes and how they can decrease their risk. We must try to decrease our rates of countywide diabetes or we will continue to see these problems.