How To Read A Food Label– for people with diabetes

Wondering how to read a food label. Once you get the hang of it, labels are easy to read because you don’t actually have to read the whole thing. There are just a few key pieces of information you need to find to help you understand how what’s inside  will affect your blood glucose. So, let’s  take alook at a typical label… The first thing you want to consider is the serving size. All the information  is based on this particular serving size. Servings per container is also listed at the top and that shows how many servings are in the whole bag, can or bottle. This is important, because the container is probably more than one serving. For example you’d probably eat this bag of chips in a single sitting but according to the label, the bag has three servings in it.

So if you’re going to eat the whole bag of chips and you want to know how many calories or carbs you are eating, you’ll have to multiply the number on the label by three. The calories are listed here and they’re important to keep an eye on as you’re planning meals and snacks.

Here are some general calorie guidelines for people with diabetes. The most common mistake people with diabetes make when reading labels is to focus on the line labeled sugar, but that only tells part of the story. If you want to know how a food will actually affect your blood glucose, you need to look at the Total Carbohydrate count, right here.

That number includes the grams of sugar, and the higher the Total Carb count is, the more that food or drink will raise your blood glucose. In general, a woman shouldn’t have more than 45 grams of carbs in an entire meal and a man shouldn’t have more than 60 grams of carbs in a meal. Ask your doctor or diabetes educator what is right for you. Think of that number as your “carb budget” for the meal. In a lot of ways, it’s like a household budget—you only have so much money and you have to pay your rent, the light bill, the gas bill and so on. To budget your carbs, you need to look at each part of your meal.

Does your drink have carbs? Your main dish? Your dessert? Add them up. If you are over budget, reduce the serving size of some of your items, or substitute a lower carb item for one of the higher carb items. And that’s how to read a label. To wrap up, what you need to check on a label are the serving size, the calories and the carb count. The higher the Total Carbohydrate number, the more the food will raise your blood glucose. You can use your recommended carb budget to budget your carbs and lower the blood glucose impact of your meals. Thanks for watching—see you next time..

As found on Youtube

Peanut Butter and Diabetes?

 

Hello, I’m Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I’m going to answer the question, is peanut butter good for diabetes. So who invented peanut butter? I bet you were going to say George Washington Carver right? Well, he did “invent” something similar to what we call peanut butter today. Marcellus Gilmore Edson was awarded U.S. Patent 306,727( for the production of peanut butter) in 1804.   Carver was merely 20 at the time. But possibly a little bit closer to which is something we use today was developed by Dr John Harvey Kellogg( yes, the cereal person) in 1895,  Then a St. Louis Doctor made a spread for this patients who needed protein but had difficulty chewing. This spread was first introduced at the St Louis World’s Fair in 1904. Regardless of who invented it, I really like peanut butter.

I personally am a Jif guy with all respect to the Skippy and other label devotees. Nutritionally peanut butter is a powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fattens, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Peanut butter also contains no cholesterol. The carbohydrate contents of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving.

The glycemic index of peanut butter is a extremely low-grade 14 which delivers the glycemic load to perfectly ZERO. Peanut butter will not elevate your blood sugar and it also helps regulate your blood sugar with all the amino battery-acids and proteins. When eaten with high-GI meat, peanut butter also helps lowering the spike of blood sugar after snacking. Carol S. Johnson, Ph.D ., guided a study at Arizona State University where researchers likened the blood-sugar levels of two snacks. One snack consisted of a buttered bagel and juice. The second snack substituted the butter with peanut butter which resulted in a minimal rise and fall of blood sugar, while the buttered bagel caused the level considerably more. So YES, peanut butter is very good for diabetes. Feed up! Merely be careful with the jelly!

As found on Youtube