Prediabetes: Are you at risk?-A light hearted wake up call

Prediabetes is a serious threat to your health but this funny commercial is one way to point someone you love to look at their risk and to get help.

For more information go to :

Or see this related post:


The Prediabetes Diet Plan: How to Reverse Prediabetes and Prevent Diabetes through Healthy Eating and Exercise

A practical, empowering guide to managing and reversing prediabetes through diet and exercise, from a registered dietitian. 

Affecting 79 million Americans, prediabetes often develops into full-blown type 2 diabetes, one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Increasingly diagnosed by doctors, prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are elevated, but not yet high enough to be labeled diabetes. While diabetes cannot be cured, prediabetes can be reversed, so it is critical to take action at an early stage. In straightforward, jargon-free language, The Prediabetes Diet Plan explains insulin resistance (the underlying cause of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes) and offers a comprehensive strategy of diet and lifestyle change, which has been proven more effective than medication. With sections on meal planning, grocery shopping, dining out, supplements, and exercise, this book empowers you to make healthier everyday choices that can effect real change on your insulin levels and overall well-being.

Prediabetes Lifestyle Changes Trump Drugs!

This video points out a number of clinical studies that show that making lifestyle changes eliminated prediabetes and was more succesful than using a diabetes drug such as metformin.

Prediabetes ; Not the End of The World

Almost 90 million Americans have it, but even though the condition can carry long-term life-threatening consequences, they may have no idea of the dangers.

Prediabetes  which, in up to 30 percent of cases, can lead to full-blown Type 2 diabetes within five years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

“It’s not a doomsday message, and it doesn’t mean you have to turn your whole world upside down because you’re prediabetic,” says Renu Mansukhani, a doctor at the National Center for Weight and Wellness in Washington in a recent Wahington Post article.

“Even just small lifestyle changes can make a big difference,” Mansukhani says.

First, , if you get a blood test back that indicates you are prediabetic, talk to your doctor about what it means and whether you should retake the test, as false positives are common.

If a second test comes back positive, make small, incremental lifestyle changes that will improve the condition for most people — but not all.

Diet: The first piece of the puzzle


One thing you do have control over is what you eat on a daily basis.

Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you can never eat a doughnut again, but it needs to be a rare treat.

The idea is to replace  simple carbohydrates (such as processed foods, fruit and milk products) with complex ones (whole grains, beans and vegetables), says Rebecca Scritchfield, a registered dietitian in Washington.

“You want to get quality carbs with lots of fiber with each meal. Combine that with protein and fat, and you can avoid spikes in your blood sugar,” Scritchfield says.

Still, she doesn’t suggest that you cut out fruit because it’s relatively high in sugar.

Pick fruits with less sugar — like berries and kiwi,” she says.

Fruit juices, though, should be avoided. They lack fiber and are high in sugar, a combination that often creates blood sugar spikes.

So instead of a glass of orange juice, eat an orange and drink a glass of water.

Along with complex carbs such as vegetables (which should take up half your plate), your meal should have protein and fat, which will help you feel satiated and “stop you from overeating carbs.


Exercise-The Second Piece

weight lifting photo

But there is another way — along with food changes, or by itself — to reduce the amount of sugar getting stuck in your bloodstream: Exercise.

Because sugar is the No. 1 fuel that muscles use for movement, exercise helps lower blood sugar.

“The big, overarching thing about exercise is that it is one of the most efficient ways to reduce insulin resistance [and lower blood glucose levels],” says Kyle Stull, a master instructor for the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

Insulin is a hormone created in the pancreas that helps deliver sugar (from food) to the muscle cells (for movement).

When insulin is resistant, it is less effective in getting the sugar — the fuel — to the muscle cells.

But with exercise, insulin becomes more sensitive, Stull says, and some studies show that blood glucose levels fall by as much as 15 percent or more after aerobic exercise.

In fact, one study showed that just 20 minutes of moderate exercise could reduce diabetes risk by 46 percent.

It has also been shown that exercise even without weight loss can reduce the risk significantly but that weight loss combined with exercise is even more effective.

What kind of exercise is the most effective, and how much of it should you do?

The recommended amount of moderate aerobic training is 30 minutes per day, he says. You can also shorten the duration and up the intensity for similar improvements, he says.

Resistance training has also been shown to help control blood sugar, and a benefit of resistance training is the building of lean body mass, leading to improved resting metabolic rate and weight loss.

“The main thing is to do something,” Stull says. “Time is the biggest obstacle. But if you can just do 10 to 20 minutes, it will make a difference.”

What if you make all these positive changes and your blood glucose level still isn’t going down — and maybe it even goes up over time?

“It’s not your fault,” Mansukhani says. “We know there is a group that doesn’t respond. In their case, medication might be necessary.” Some patients even undergo weight-loss surgery to help deal with their increased risk,

Bear in mind that incremental lifestyle changes that encourage less stress, more sleep, healthier eating and more exercise have benefits beyond diabetes prevention.   Remember, baby steps.

“Don’t try to cut carbs completely — you’re setting yourself up. But maybe choose an apple instead of an apple crisp or doughnut,” Scritchfield says.

Change your diet and add some exercise and monitor and track your blood sugar and you will be headed in the right direction.



Diabetic Living Eat to Beat Diabetes: Stop Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes: 175 Healthy Recipes to Change Your Life

An achievable plan for beating type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, with more than 100 photos and complete nutrition information.

So much more than a cookbook, Eat to Beat Diabetes is a lifestyle guide for losing weight, balancing blood sugar, and controlling diabetes for good. The book features the 10 research-based, evidence-proven healthy habits you should adopt to gain control over type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. Each chapter presents a new habit and gives simple strategies and expert tips to make it stick. One chapter, Eat More Fruits and Veggies, includes beautifully photographed features on blending fruit and veggie smoothies and creating easy, produce-packed lunches. A second, Get to Know Portions, offers smart tricks for stretching portions (stir nonstarchy cauliflower into mashed potatoes to double the serving). Lending encouragement throughout are profiles of people who have managed their diabetes and turned their lives around. With a lay-flat concealed wiro binding designed for everyday use, this photo-filled book is as much a friendly kitchen companion as an authoritative plan for changing your life.

Pre-Diabetes Diagnosis-Be Thankful



If you have a Pre-Diabetes  diagnosis then be thankful. Now before you think I’ve gone crazy here me out.

I got a Pre-Diabetes diagnosis and believe me my first thoughts were not ones of gratitude but were more of the why me variety. After a little reflection I realized I was fortunate because I had an opportunity to take action to improve my health hopefully before too much damage was done.

Why Me?

The answer to the Why Me part was easy. Diabetes can be a hereditary disease. My Mom and her Mom had diabetes. My Mom progressed into being a Type 1 Diabetic. She had a lot of complications from the disease. She struggled to eat right and to keep her blood sugar levels in an acceptable range. My brother is diabetic. I was and am overweight and in the past few years have became more sedentary. I enjoy food, like to cook and barbecue, and enjoy a cold beer as much as any other guy. I also like carbs,not just the liquid kind like beer or a Coke but rice (Cajun food), bread, etc. Yup, a regular fat poster boy for Diabetes.

 Pre-Diabetes Definition: An A1C Test Result between 5.7-6.4,Fasting Blood Sugar of 100-125 mg/dl
Blood sugar is elevated but not yet high enough to be called Diabetes
diabetes infographics photo
Photo by National Institutes of Health (NIH)

The Mayo Clinic Staff lists these factors that also might indicate you might be Pre- Diabetic or at risk of becoming diabetic:

Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for pre-diabetes, such as:

You’re overweight, with a body mass index above 25

You’re inactive
You’re age 45 or older
You have a family history of type 2 diabetes
You’re African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American or a Pacific Islander
You developed gestational diabetes when you were pregnant or gave birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds (4.1 kilograms)
You have poly-cystic ovary syndrome — a condition characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity
You have high blood pressure
Your high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is below 35 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) (0.9 millimoles per liter, or mmol/L) or your triglyceride level is above 250 mg/dL (2.83 mmol/L)

If you are Pre-Diabetic and do nothing studies have shown that within 10 years you will develop Type II Diabetes.


If you scored high on either of these tests please have your doctor evaluate your risk further and get an A1C and fasting blood glucose test conducted. If you are pre-diabetic or diabetic take action to preserve your health.
Subscribe to this blog for the latest news and information you need.

If this post has been helpful to you please take a minute to comment and to share with others that might also benefit.

Join Me on Facebook at